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Tournedos Rossini

The dinner Tom and I ate this Christmas Eve was arguably the best meal we’d ever made for ourselves. It was also extremely costly, but we regarded it as a Christmas gift to each other. Its centerpiece was a slightly tamed version of Tournedos Rossini.

Properly done, that luscious French dish is a filet mignon sauteed in butter, sitting on a round of bread sauteed in butter, topped with a thick slice of bloc foie gras, garnished with a piece of black truffle, and bathed with a complicated Madeira-and-truffle sauce. Caloric megadeath for sure, but what a way to go! For our version, adapted from the recipe in the Classic French Cooking volume of the Time-Life Foods of the World series, we vastly simplified the sauce and substituted morels for the truffle. It was still wonderful.

With the change in the sauce, it wasn’t at all difficult to make. The published recipe uses a sauce base of fond lié, a complex sauce that’s itself based on fond brun de veau, a French “mother sauce” that takes at least eight hours to make. Instead we defrosted some of Tom’s hearty meat-and-vegetable broth and boiled down that very flavorful liquid to concentrate it even further. To that base we added a dose of good Sercial Madeira that we’d also reduced by half (skipping the truffle juice that the recipe wanted added to the wine). It wasn’t as rich as the classic sauce, but it tasted very good. A small amount of a high-quality Madeira does wonders for sauces.
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Other than setting out the remaining ingredients on the kitchen counter, we didn’t do any more work on the dish until after we’d finished our first course at dinner (American transmontanus caviar on homemade buckwheat blini and a glass apiece of champagne; if you’re going to splurge, go all the way). Then I began heating vegetables (tiny green peas and sauteed morels that we’d frozen fresh earlier in the year) while Tom browned slices of my white bread in butter.
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We transferred the bread to dinner plates and in the same pan (with more butter) sauteed our filet mignons. They were larger than the classic tournedos cuts, but that wasn’t a problem.
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Keeping the steaks warm on the plates, we quickly deglazed the pan with more Madeira, stirred in the previously made sauce base, and simmered it briefly. (We skipped the step of straining the sauce and swirling in yet more butter: Neither was really necessary.)

On each steak we placed a thick slice of duck foie gras and a small morel to serve as a faux truffle, and poured the sauce over them.
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Magnificent! A wonderful combination of flavors. The foie gras virtually melted into the beef the moment it was cut into. And it is an honest opinion, not sour grapes, to say that morels are tastier than most black truffles. Certainly they are never as aromatic, but they are definitely more flavorful.

All this magnificence had an equally great companion in the Drouhin 2004 Chambolle Musigny Premier Cru that Santa provided. Tom may have more to say about that wine soon on his blog.

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